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Designing Women S4 E15 - Rude, Lazy, Horny & Dumb

Updated: May 9, 2023

The Sugarbakers take on a client with a wife and a mistress, and as Suzanne so wisely predicted, things get interesting. It’s like this: You don’t know what you don’t know, you know? Speaking of things we don’t know, Nikki sidebars on Unsolved Mysteries.


Then come back later in the week for an “Extra Sugar” where we’ll take a closer look at all the “m” words: you know, marriage, monogamy, and mistresses.


Read up if you’d like:

Come on y’all, let’s get into it!





 

Transcript

Salina: Hey, Nikki.

Salina: Hey, Salina.

Nikki: And hello, everyone, and welcome to Sweet TNTV, where I've talked for 17 hours and now I sound like I've smoked 18 packs of cigarettes.

Salina: It's been a long one.

Salina: Today we are on episode this is our fifth episode we've recorded today, if you count the extra sugars as all separate.

Nikki: That's right.

Salina: And we did two of our longest ever episodes.

Nikki: That's right.

Nikki: But you all don't know that until now.

Nikki: You do.

Nikki: Now you do now.

Salina: I think they deserve to know, Salina.

Nikki: I do.

Nikki: Because I think when we don't sound fresh, I feel bad.

Salina: I don't know about you.

Salina: I always sound fresh.

Nikki: Oh, sorry.

Nikki: Not you.

Nikki: Just me.

Salina: Just me.

Nikki: Well, I wanted to start off today by telling you something that I haven't actually had, like, a chance to tell you off mic, so why not tell you on exciting?

Salina: Is it exciting?

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: It's exciting, but it's something that we've talked about in the past, and I finally did it.

Nikki: We talked about watching it.

Nikki: I actually don't know if you've seen it or not, but I got on that southern charm train oh, God.

Salina: Salina.

Salina: Between the above ground, below deck, below deck, underground, upper decker.

Nikki: I don't know an upper god, I don't want to see that show.

Salina: How is it?

Nikki: It's good.

Nikki: Have you ever watched even one episode?

Salina: Not okay.

Nikki: So I know, like, at some point, we were like, just trying to look for southern content, and you're like, well, I get a southern charm, and I was like, a reality show.

Nikki: And this is back when I don't want to say something as rude as I had standards because that would be super rude.

Salina: That's rude.

Nikki: That would be so rude.

Nikki: And I would never say that.

Nikki: But back before I had really gotten on the reality show train before you.

Salina: Hit the bottom of Netflix.

Nikki: Before I ran out of other show.

Nikki: No, it's actually not on Netflix, okay?

Nikki: I'm not giving you the whole giddy on where you can see it.

Nikki: But before, I had really gotten sucked in to different reality shows and realized.

Salina: That they are super entertaining, which is why people keep watching them.

Nikki: They know what they're doing for sure.

Nikki: Before that, we had talked, like, maybe we could watch this or do this and talk about it, but I think you had said maybe you had watched a clip or something, and you're like, I don't know.

Nikki: But I was talking to one of my friends a couple of weekends ago, and she was talking about how much she really enjoyed it.

Nikki: And then there's like so there's three.

Nikki: Did you know this?

Salina: No.

Nikki: So, the original one is in Charleston.

Nikki: Then they've done one in Savannah and New Orleans.

Nikki: And given I'm about to go to New Orleans and I love Savannah and Charleston, I was like, it might be worth watching it just to watch the set piece.

Nikki: Part of it sure.

Nikki: And just to see different cool places in these areas.

Nikki: And so I gave it a shot and it did take me, like, a little bit to warm up to it, mainly because it's been on eight seasons.

Nikki: 2014 is like, a long time ago.

Nikki: And so, honestly, the first season looks old.

Nikki: It's like before they were just doing HD with everything.

Nikki: So I feel like I'm watching something from like 2000 at first, but it totally sucked me in.

Nikki: I'm all the way in.

Nikki: So if anybody is interested in watching it, you can find it on Hulu.

Nikki: If you have Hulu, here's why I tuned out of Hulu.

Nikki: I also had to watch the commercials.

Nikki: And I can't do that.

Nikki: Commercials commercial free is on Peacock.

Salina: Okay.

Nikki: I had to have peacock for the office.

Nikki: They took The Office off Netflix because that's my happy place show for you, like King of Queens.

Nikki: And so, anyways, it's a goodie like, a lot of the people who are on the show, this is where, you know, I get weird about talking about real people.

Nikki: But you've also put yourself on reality TV.

Nikki: So sorry, you're kind of in that squishy lane.

Nikki: But what is really fascinating, I think outside of the fact that I love Charleston is just this idea that it's not all old families, but it's some families that go back to almost the very beginning of Charleston being established as a city.

Nikki: And that is one old a** city for America.

Nikki: And so it's interesting to see the perspectives of people who come from families that are that old and have that kind of, I guess, notoriety who are that established.

Nikki: I come from poor farmers.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: So I think it's interesting to see that kind of perspective.

Nikki: Obviously, they're making it juicy and gossipy.

Nikki: It's reality TV.

Nikki: But there are a couple of characters I've just characters there are a couple of people on the show that I've really warmed to and it's just interesting.

Nikki: So I was going to give it a shout out and say for the show that's been on 100 years now, but tell you that it might be worth checking out.

Nikki: Okay.

Nikki: My friend tells me because I'm just still on Charleston in an embarrassingly far down the path kind of way for the amount of time I've seen it.

Nikki: But I am told that Savannah and New Orleans, like, Savannah is not nearly as good.

Nikki: New Orleans is like, maybe second best.

Salina: Okay.

Nikki: But Charleston is the best of these.

Salina: I started trying to watch the new season of Love Is Blind because in terms of reality shows, that one has a little bit of a soft spot for me.

Salina: And I do this strange thing with reality TV where for one day I will just blow through the episodes and then I just cannot convince myself to start again.

Nikki: That's where I am with love is blind.

Nikki: I love the first Love strong.

Nikki: I really enjoyed the first season so different.

Salina: Right.

Salina: And you just had to know what was going to happen.

Nikki: Yeah.

Nikki: And then in the subsequent seasons, like, I've just gotten a little less and less interested.

Salina: It's really hard because they're almost a victim of their own success because you know the things that are happening in the background.

Salina: So Nicola she and Vanessa Lache have been asked, like, why are there only attractive people on the show?

Salina: And they've said some really not so great things, some little cringy things.

Nikki: Oh, I don't know about this.

Salina: Basically, Nick said something like, only attractive people have the confidence to do this sort of thing, which is just, like, not a great answer to that sort of question.

Salina: When your show is in the crosshairs for something controversial, that's not a great answer.

Salina: Started to make me feel weird.

Salina: The guy last season who, like, on camera made himself cry.

Salina: So, you know, there are people now who know enough about the show that they're trying to build a career for themselves or build some sort of narrative.

Salina: The first season, I genuinely don't think these people knew what they were walking into.

Salina: So some of their least amazing characteristics about themselves played out on camera beautifully, even not even to their own.

Salina: Like, they weren't trying.

Salina: So I think that was beautiful and wonderful and made for great TV.

Salina: Now I watch it, wondering how much of this is played up.

Nikki: Yeah, it's interesting because, okay, you can argue that reality TV goes back to Real World, but when it really took off is during the writer strikes in the early 2000s.

Nikki: Right.

Nikki: That's where we go from having, like, one over here, one over here, and they're like a novelty to just, like, regular programming.

Nikki: They're cheaper to make.

Nikki: They can pay the people who are in them less.

Nikki: I mean, it's like a whole thing.

Nikki: But now I feel like we're in these later stages of reality TV shows.

Nikki: So what's interesting on Southern Charm, when you're talking about, like, you can see people, like, trying to build a career.

Nikki: One of the girls on it was on Real World when she was 19.

Nikki: She's our age.

Salina: Okay.

Nikki: Then there's another girl who was on So Young.

Nikki: I don't know why I'm calling just a baby.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: I'm calling them girls.

Nikki: There's another woman who's on We're Just Girls, which I'm just a small child, basically, just trying to make it this world.

Nikki: She was on Survivor, like, ten years ago.

Nikki: And so it's weird or interesting, I guess, to see these individuals kind of cycle through different shows, and then they meet in these reality TV circles, they become friends and then meet up on these other shows.

Nikki: What a strange world.

Salina: It's a weird, incestuous thing, and it just makes it really hard for me to watch.

Nikki: Yeah, it's definitely something, but if you just get in one of those moods where you want to blow through something.

Salina: I might have to start it.

Nikki: Yeah, I don't know.

Nikki: It's been an interesting watch.

Nikki: Okay.

Nikki: And I don't know.

Nikki: Just also, I think in terms of thinking about the southernness of it, it's interesting to pay attention to the accents, the politics, almost, of the area and how they kind of weave that into the show.

Nikki: It's not very blatant.

Nikki: You would be kind of silly to do that, honestly, because then you would, like, turn off audiences or whatever, but it is a little bit there in the sauce.

Nikki: And then just like this idea of southern eccentricity oh, no.

Nikki: And how that plays in I'm also.

Salina: A little scared, being from South Carolina, how that's going to between that and the southern lawyer who just got all the attention for murdering his family.

Salina: I don't know, man.

Salina: It's been a rough go for South Carolina lately.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: It's a bad go for them.

Nikki: I tell you.

Nikki: My favorite thing is watching when they do the reunions with Andy Cohen.

Nikki: I love him so much.

Nikki: I think he is just so good at his job.

Nikki: And to see him kind of go toe to toe with some of these people because people are like, by the time they get to the reunions, it's just like, gloves are off.

Nikki: They're kind of like nuts with each other.

Nikki: And just to see him be like, I don't know.

Nikki: I think you're being kind of an a****** is, like, just kind of great.

Nikki: Anyway, so all to say, it's worth a watch.

Nikki: I will say that there's a lot of infidelity that happens on this show.

Salina: First up on my list, speaking of infidelity infidelity.

Nikki: Nice transition, Salina.

Nikki: I tried.

Salina: So we are at Designing Women season four.

Salina: This is episode 14.

Salina: Or is it labeled episode 15?

Salina: I think they was a two part.

Salina: Anyhow.

Salina: This episode is called The Mistress.

Salina: The IMDb description is the ladies are hired to redesign a house for a man as well as his condo, where he keeps his Mistress air date January 8, 1990 we're calling this one Rude, Lazy, H****, and dumb.

Salina: It's written by LBT.

Salina: And directed by Iris Dugout, who we haven't seen since The Naked Truth last season.

Salina: General reactions.

Salina: Let's start there.

Salina: What you got, Salina?

Nikki: My first general reaction is I was trying to look for an episode number.

Salina: I'm sorry.

Nikki: No, my first general reaction is that I really like this one more on rewatch than initially.

Salina: Okay.

Nikki: And I think it's because I really like the ones where we get to interact more with the clients and see sugar bakers in the wild.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: I think you could probably argue that this is like a bottleneck episode because you kind of got them trapped all in one place with one of the wives.

Nikki: But I don't know.

Nikki: It still worked for me.

Nikki: I would also argue that this turns the mistress trope a little bit on its head with the mistress being the one who was a little duped.

Nikki: Typically, I think we see either both women are in the dark and the man has all the power, or maybe, just like, the wife doesn't know.

Nikki: And in that case, do you think there's a little ambiguity in the name of this episode?

Nikki: Does it refer to Louise?

Nikki: Does it refer Lois?

Nikki: I can't even remember the way her name was pronounced.

Nikki: Now.

Nikki: Is it Gabby or is it both?

Nikki: Because technically, the wife is someone is with someone, too, which would also make.

Salina: Her a mistress if they're married.

Salina: If the other someone is married.

Nikki: I think in my studies, for the extra sugar, it's either way.

Salina: Okay.

Nikki: Because we just really hate women is what I'm trying to say.

Nikki: Okay.

Salina: Yeah, probably.

Salina: I don't know.

Salina: I don't know how to answer that.

Nikki: Did you not hear me say at the top, Salina, that we've been recording for 7 hours of veritata?

Nikki: Cannot answer your questions anymore?

Nikki: It's really more rhetorical anyway.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: What about you?

Salina: Well, the reason I'm pausing it, I think my mind just got blown a little bit is my first general reaction was, it's been a while since we had, like, a twist episode, and this one had, like, twist on twist, and so I think you just added an extra twist.

Nikki: I wasn't prepared.

Salina: So there was, like, the twist of the I hate the word mistress, but the twist of the mistress not being aware that he was married.

Salina: Paramore, sure.

Salina: But then I think of the band paramore oh, no.

Salina: But then the twist of the wife knowing about the woman he was having the affair with but keeping it a secret because she also was having an affair.

Salina: It was just twist on twist.

Salina: And I thought anytime they do a twist in that way, I kind of love it.

Salina: So that was my first general reaction.

Salina: But then I got my brain twisted.

Nikki: Yeah, my bad.

Nikki: Because my next general reaction is another.

Salina: One with a twist.

Salina: Couldn't we have just said that?

Nikki: But also, I feel like part of it is this idea, just this whole set up of how we spend all this time with Sugar Bakers getting themselves all in a tizzy, right, where they're trying to come to this woman's defense.

Nikki: She's so innocent, she's been so deceived, but she not only knows about the affair, she's having one, and she winds up being p***** at Sugar Bakers for ruining it for her.

Salina: Kind of just a reminder that moral code isn't always black and white to everybody, and what you think isn't always relevant to what other people think.

Salina: And just stay out of it.

Nikki: Yeah, because you never know what happens behind closed doors, right.

Salina: It's just none of your business.

Salina: The only other general reaction I had is that Jean Smart didn't even get an episode before she came back to work.

Salina: So on my first watch, I was like, Dang, she just had a baby.

Salina: And in real life, we know Jean Smart just had a baby.

Salina: But anyway, when I went and looked back into it, this one actually was taped at the end of November, and the previous episode was taped after this one.

Nikki: I could see.

Nikki: I was just thinking, is it possible.

Salina: That they recorded them out of all of it?

Salina: It is, and they did.

Nikki: So there you go.

Salina: But I was like, miffed on her behalf.

Salina: I was like, can't they give her any time off?

Salina: And then I read that and I.

Nikki: Was like, all right, please get that right.

Nikki: I don't want to upset anyone.

Salina: One guy on the Facebook group, Nikki, I need him to know he lives rent free in my brain.

Nikki: Another kind of general just reaction I had to this one was just Gabby.

Salina: You mean Logan Huntsberger's mom?

Nikki: That's right.

Nikki: I was going to tee you up, but you took it, so good job.

Nikki: David just really like to put her in unlikable roles.

Nikki: That's her shtick.

Salina: Yeah.

Salina: I think it's what she plays really well.

Nikki: Yeah.

Nikki: I thought she almost looks unlikable to.

Salina: Me at this point.

Nikki: I know.

Nikki: It was tough.

Nikki: It's like thinking through the things that she did.

Nikki: Can you imagine if somebody left you waiting 35 minutes and then talking, sorry, I was reading.

Nikki: I would be like, all right, I'm leaving.

Salina: Yeah.

Salina: I don't think I wouldn't have stayed 30 minutes.

Nikki: She didn't even remember Jeffrey's name.

Nikki: What's wrong with this woman?

Salina: Sad.

Nikki: She's a sculptorist.

Nikki: I'm just going to tell you right now, it doesn't get more pretentious sounding than that.

Nikki: Except for all the sculptresses out there.

Nikki: Good job.

Nikki: Yeah.

Salina: If you call yourself a sculptress, I.

Nikki: Mean, at least call yourself an artist.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: And then her reaction to Anthony was like, weird.

Nikki: This is the whole thing.

Nikki: And it was like I mean, I think they purposely wrote it this way, but it just came off like racist and terrible.

Nikki: Yeah.

Nikki: I don't even want to repeat it.

Nikki: It was so weird.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: What else did you have in general reactions?

Salina: That's all my generals.

Salina: I got strays left.

Nikki: Okay.

Nikki: Just the colonels.

Nikki: Like a general and a colonel.

Nikki: It's like akernel.

Salina: You know where my mind went?

Salina: Colonel Sanders.

Salina: Which means I'm starting to get hungry again.

Nikki: Got to get that secret spice and seasoning mix, 67 spices or whatever.

Salina: I don't like KFC.

Salina: I'm just going to say that.

Nikki: Well, there goes our opportunity there.

Salina: Well, I will tell them if they want to know it's, because I had a craving for it after I delivered my last child and my husband went and got it, and it was awful.

Salina: It was not at all what I wanted it to be.

Salina: And I don't know that it's KFC's fault.

Salina: It might have been the franchise's fault.

Salina: Yeah.

Salina: But we had to throw a bucket of chicken away.

Nikki: It was that bad.

Salina: It was that bad.

Nikki: And Kyle thought it was bad, too.

Salina: Oh, yeah.

Salina: Kyle took one bite, I took two bites, he took one, and we threw it all away.

Salina: That was my last experience with KFC.

Nikki: Not an episode.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: Well, not everybody is now.

Nikki: I mean, I would probably give it another shot this many years later.

Salina: I don't know.

Salina: Yeah, that's axby, but chickfila publix, I'm.

Nikki: Having their fried chicken every day anyways.

Nikki: I mean, I'm not I would love to, though.

Nikki: Okay.

Nikki: So speaking of stray observations, what were yours?

Salina: The opening scene when Suzanne was eating rice cakes in the kitchen and Sam Walton came up feels very parallel to episode two this season.

Nikki: You're smiling knowingly just because rice cakes is also in my strays.

Salina: This time, though, it feels like she regained the power.

Salina: So last time they were giving her a hard time because she didn't know Sam Walton.

Salina: Like, she didn't know any of these millionaires.

Salina: Like, she was sort of the b*** of the joke.

Salina: This time she regains the power and says, it's just that he's from Arkansas.

Salina: He's not from Atlanta, her town.

Salina: So she kind of, like, comes out I'm sure in Suzanne's mind, comes out on top on that argument, but it all felt very parallel to that previous one.

Nikki: Well, it's also hard to not think that anytime that there's something about dieting or anything that she also had a hand in it, because we've talked now about how she really tried to take her power back this season to be like, I'd rather just get out in front of it and address it in episodes.

Nikki: But I actually felt that rice cake bit, like, in my bones, cranky after 12 hours of dieting.

Salina: Check.

Nikki: Cheating by putting something like jelly on a rice cake, check.

Nikki: Except I'd be like, I'll just put a little chocolate on there, a little peanut butter, a little piece of chicken, 600 calorie snack, and then annoyed by naturally little people.

Nikki: Check.

Nikki: So I feel you in that scene.

Nikki: And also rice cakes.

Nikki: What are we pretending with that?

Salina: I do.

Salina: I like the caramel ones.

Salina: Pretty good bit.

Salina: But like, a plain rice cake is about the grossest thing in the world.

Nikki: The texture is a little bit like a coaster.

Salina: Yes.

Nikki: What I imagine it will be to be like, I think I'll have a coaster for a snack anyways.

Nikki: Stray.

Nikki: Any other strays?

Salina: I have two cut lines I wanted to mention.

Salina: There was a line cut when Charlene fell asleep while the man, Mr.

Salina: Pollard, was talking, I think.

Salina: Julia says, you'll have to excuse Charlene.

Salina: She has a new baby.

Salina: Somebody says weed waker, but this is really the only chance she gets to sleep.

Salina: And then he says, hey, I understand.

Salina: I raised four children myself, so that's the first time we hear about this life that he and his wife have built together.

Salina: There was another cut line by Suzanne after Julia says it's none of their business what he does in either house.

Salina: Julia, I can't believe you're saying this.

Salina: I thought you'd be all up in arms.

Salina: Well, I would be up in arms if he were my husband, but he's not my husband, he's my client.

Salina: Up in arms?

Salina: Julia?

Salina: Are you kidding?

Salina: If Reese Watson ever thought of having a mistress, the very least you would do is blow up his car and burn his apartment to the ground.

Salina: And I feel like we kind of got like a nice reminder of how over the top Julia can be in things.

Salina: And also how Suzanne did not believe she was going to be able to stay out of all this.

Nikki: I thought you were going to say we got a preview to Waiting to Exhale years in advance.

Nikki: I don't know if you remember it's in Angela Bassett, she sets the car on fire out front and walks away from it like a boss.

Salina: It's not a reference I think about.

Nikki: I just thought about it for the first time right now.

Nikki: Yeah.

Salina: Do you have any more strength?

Nikki: I don't think I could take it any more straight than that.

Salina: I can.

Salina: So you already mentioned recognizable guest star Leanne Hunley, who played Gabby, who was also in Dynasty, the Beverly Hillbillies movie, which I just have to acknowledge, this is the second time that's come up for me recently.

Salina: And then, of course, she played Shera Huntsberger, who is like peak villain on Gilmore Girls.

Salina: Patricia Wilson played Mrs.

Salina: Philpott olivia's nanny.

Salina: A quick scan of her IMDb tells me she was also in The Nutty Professor and A League of Their Own, which we just talked about offline earlier.

Salina: She plays the older version of Marla Hooch.

Nikki: Okay, I can see that.

Nikki: Sure.

Salina: But to be totally transparent with you, the only reason I brought that up is because Miss Spillpot's storyline has to do with Unsolved Mysteries.

Salina: And I want to talk about Unsolved mysteries.

Salina: Hello.

Salina: Sidebar, please.

Salina: It's a sidebar.

Salina: Nikki Sidebar.

Salina: She's got a keyboard looking for a reward by taking deep in the obscure, taking us on a detour.

Salina: What you got, Mickey?

Salina: Mickey sidebar.

Salina: That means it gets you every time, doesn't it?

Nikki: It really does.

Nikki: It also sounds like me on social media videos when I screw something up and I go back and I try and record something, except yours is meant to be funny.

Nikki: And me, I'm just trying really hard to drop new stuff in and I'm.

Salina: Like, dang it, that sucks.

Salina: Well, when we were pre watching this season, the Unsolved Mysteries reference stuck out.

Salina: I think we went back and forth on like, should it be an extra sugar?

Salina: Should it be it needed to be something.

Salina: And I think I'm thinking Nikki Sidebar is the perfect length for it.

Salina: I just couldn't miss an opportunity to talk about it because I say the word Unsolved Mysteries and all I hear in my head is that theme song.

Nikki: I just didn't want to get in trouble.

Nikki: What if I went?

Nikki: Yeah, exactly.

Nikki: Bad boys, bad boys.

Salina: What you can I do I grew up on repeats of Unsolved Mysteries on Lifetime.

Nikki: Scared me.

Nikki: I don't know why.

Nikki: Go ahead.

Salina: So probably because you were home alone, right?

Nikki: Yeah.

Salina: Usually I had siblings at home with me.

Salina: My sister and I would watch it together.

Nikki: Thanks for the past going.

Salina: Yeah.

Salina: It can be a very scary show, I will acknowledge that.

Salina: And there were scared of disappearing.

Salina: There were people well, actually, it was a supernatural stuff that I had to skip forward sometimes.

Salina: Although some of those were my favorite plotlines as well.

Salina: Anyway, for anyone who doesn't know, Unsolved Mysteries is a documentary style TV show following it following, you guessed it, Unsolved Mysteries.

Salina: So it'd be like crimes, other mysteries of life.

Salina: Like I said, for me, some of the very best episodes, but also very most terrifying were the supernatural ones.

Salina: So it was created by John Cosgrove and Terry Dunn.

Nikki: Mirror.

Salina: I looked this up and I didn't write down the pronunciation, but I think it's Mirror.

Salina: It started out as a special series of just seven episodes in 1987.

Salina: That special series featured three different hosts raymond Burr, who played Perry Mason carl Malden, who was a classic Hollywood actor having appeared in A Streetcar Named Desire and Robert Stack, who had been in the late 50s early Sixty s TV show The Untouchables and then the silly comedy Airplane in like 1980.

Salina: Lots of other things in their BIOS, but those were hot points.

Salina: By 1988, just two years before this Designing Women episode aired, it became a full series hosted solely by Stack.

Salina: It aired on NBC for nine seasons, then moved to CBS for two seasons.

Salina: It's 10th and 11th before it was canceled, ending in 1999.

Salina: I didn't realize it was picked up after that by Lifetime in 2000 and aired there until 2002.

Salina: Until just before Robert Stack's death in 2003.

Salina: The show was revived once in the late aughts by Spike TV.

Salina: But I read I had that just written.

Salina: It was revived and then I ended.

Salina: And then the more research I did, I found out that that revival was just like, repackaging of old content, which led to a lot of confusion because they actually repackaged old episodes that had actually been solved and didn't note it in any way.

Salina: Short sightedness.

Nikki: Yeah.

Nikki: No review boards or anything.

Nikki: No.

Salina: I'm so weird.

Salina: It did receive a six episode restart in 2020 on Netflix.

Salina: Full disclosure shockingly, I haven't watched it.

Salina: I really need to, but I haven't watched it yet, so I feel like I need to say that on that show I learned about journalist Keeley Shay Smith, who worked on the show for a few seasons as a special reporter.

Salina: I learned about her there rather than from another notable role in her life Pierce Brosnan's wife.

Nikki: Oh, okay.

Salina: I read.

Salina: Matthew McConaughey was on a 1991 episode which was filmed in Texas, his hometown.

Salina: It's one of his first ever appearances in entertainment.

Salina: Cheryl Hines of Curb Your Enthusiasm was on an episode.

Salina: And Taryn Killam from SNL was on an episode.

Salina: He is robert stack's great nephew.

Salina: Just one great nephew.

Salina: So today there's like no shortage of crime type content in entertainment.

Salina: It's really prolific in the podcast genre, for sure, but it wasn't in a genre of its own.

Salina: In the late eighty S, it was really the only sort of show of this kind.

Salina: And it really differed from news programs for a couple of reasons.

Salina: One, it did dramatizations.

Salina: That's really what Unsolved Mysteries is known for.

Salina: They do these, like, reenactments.

Salina: In fact, NBC News disavowed the program early in its run because it featured supernatural events, and they forced them to add content, noting that it wasn't a news broadcast.

Salina: I remember that from watching it.

Salina: What you're about to see is not news, it's something.

Salina: Their dramatizations have been added or something.

Salina: That's why.

Salina: And then at the end of segments, they'd encourage viewers to call or write in if they had information to share, which is audience participation in the obviously.

Nikki: News programs don't invite like Ms.

Nikki: Philpott.

Salina: Like Ms.

Salina: Philpott.

Salina: So she says Suzanne was just doing her duty.

Nikki: That's right.

Salina: So over the years, they covered a lot of different types of mysteries, from murder mysteries to, like I said, paranormal mysteries.

Salina: I wanted to share three mysteries from the show that they are credited with helping to solve.

Salina: So number one came from a season six episode.

Salina: So that was about May 1994, focusing on a man named Craig Williamson.

Salina: He had gone missing just the year before, in 1993, while on a business trip.

Salina: It's a little loopy, but for whatever reason, his wife was sure he was still alive.

Salina: She had some evidence that made her think that, but she had a theory he was suffering from amnesia.

Salina: Shockingly, in July 1995, a year after it aired, craig saw himself on a rerun of the episode and recognized himself.

Salina: As it turns out, he claimed he had been beaten, but he didn't remember anything else, not even his wife.

Salina: So he returned home.

Salina: I read that he and his wife reconciled, but then split up.

Salina: Ultimately, investigators remain really dubious about his story, and I looked into it one more time this morning because I felt like I needed to close the loop on it.

Salina: He had just started a business with his wife, and they had taken out a large loan, and so investigators believed that he had stolen away because he was trying to escape from his life.

Salina: The part that's hard for me to reconcile with that is, why come back?

Salina: And I read in like a couple of internet forums this morning, people's theory, people theorize he came back because he felt like he owed his wife some closure, and he.

Salina: Just did some self reflection and realized he was being kind of a jerk and he came back.

Salina: I don't know.

Salina: Either way, the show helped solve it, right?

Salina: Danny and Kathy Freeman were an Oklahoma family who lost their home in 1999 to a fire.

Salina: Kathy's body was found inside, but her husband, daughter and daughter's friend were all missing.

Salina: Even more strange, when they pulled Kathy from the home, they realized she hadn't died in the fire.

Salina: She had been shot.

Salina: Initially, investigators believed Danny, her husband, had done it, but when the daughter's friend's family so her friend was missing as well.

Salina: When her family visited the rubble the next day, they were trying to look for clues.

Salina: They found Danny's body.

Salina: He also had been shot.

Salina: After many years of investigating, including the feature on Unsolved Mysteries about the crime in 2018.

Salina: So this happened in 1999.

Salina: In 2018, an arrest was finally made.

Salina: However, unfortunately, the girl's bodies were never recovered.

Nikki: Jeez.

Salina: Then the last one I was going to mention.

Salina: This one kind of gives me chills a little bit.

Salina: It's a season three episode featuring the story of Patricia Stallings.

Salina: She had been put in jail while pregnant after being accused of poisoning her other child, Ryan, with antifreeze.

Salina: When she was pregnant, she gave birth in jail and that baby was placed in foster care because she was in jail for having killed her other kid.

Salina: That child was ultimately diagnosed with a genetic condition called methyl melonic academia, which can produce the same symptoms as antifreeze poisoning.

Salina: The judge in the trial wouldn't accept medical testimony, so Patty's lawyer couldn't argue that her son Ryan, the other child, had died of that condition.

Salina: She was placed in prison for life.

Salina: However, after the episode aired, doctors across the country called in to support her argument and a test was finally performed which confirmed Ryan had died from that disease.

Salina: Patty was released and reunited with her son.

Nikki: Oh, my God.

Salina: Wild, right?

Salina: I read a little bit more and it's a little hazy now because it's been a while since I read it, but I think, unfortunately, that the living son ultimately died of the disease and Patty and her husband, I think, divorced as well.

Salina: So it really did a number on their family.

Salina: That's terrible.

Salina: Yeah.

Salina: So I'm going to link to more information in the show notes, both about Unsolved Mysteries, where I pulled these stories from, and a couple, I think maybe one more reference, if any other armed chair detectives want to do their own work but stealing your transition.

Salina: Salina.

Salina: I liked Unsolved Mysteries.

Salina: Do you want to talk about other things we like?

Nikki: That sounds great.

Nikki: I just thought Charlene falling asleep at her desk because she's sleep deprived from baby Olivia.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: It's gene smart.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: She's just good.

Nikki: How everyone reacts and her, like, trying to drag out and it just gets.

Salina: Worse, gets more and more awkward.

Nikki: I saw myself also in that, except it was charming when she did it.

Salina: How bad was it?

Nikki: Yeah, and when I do it, it's not charming when I try and make something better.

Nikki: That's just getting increasingly worse.

Nikki: But it worked for her.

Nikki: And then I thought I was going to well, that sounds bad.

Nikki: Whatever.

Nikki: I thought I was going to crap myself.

Nikki: When Gabby says she wants to do an all white room, which she describes as taking a lot of courage, to which Mary Joe replies, well, I don't think that much courage.

Nikki: I mean, not when you compare it to, for example, getting your brains blown out in Vietnam and I like, lost it.

Salina: That is such an important comparison frame.

Nikki: That was very visceral.

Salina: But yeah, generally in life speaking, that's a good comparison.

Nikki: You just need to always bring it back to that baby.

Nikki: I'm like, oh, well, that's a very good point.

Salina: Thank you.

Nikki: That is more courage.

Salina: Thank you.

Nikki: What did you like?

Salina: I don't have that much to say about this episode.

Salina: What I will say is kind of doubling down on something I said a minute ago, which is I love a good Twist episode.

Salina: And the first time I watched this, I had such a laugh out loud about Mrs.

Salina: Pollard's breakdown over the end of her special arrangement.

Salina: It is so over the top and soap opera e when she's like, I.

Nikki: Knew.

Salina: It was just so extra and delivered so beautifully.

Salina: It lost a little punch the second time I watched it, but not that much.

Salina: It was really funny.

Salina: Suzanne going, well, I think she knew.

Nikki: Speaking of Suzanne, I think that was my other like, is that the one Suzanne I haven't liked in recent seasons or in this season?

Salina: Is the excuse me, Suzanne?

Nikki: Yeah, it's like a little much, but this one dry wit Suzanne.

Nikki: I know what I'm talking about.

Nikki: Broad Suzanne.

Nikki: I like that a lot.

Salina: She knew what was happening the whole time and she was trying to warn them.

Salina: She was trying to get them.

Salina: She knew they were going to get too far in on this one.

Nikki: I think that's right.

Salina: What about things you didn't like?

Nikki: Yeah, I have none.

Salina: None?

Salina: So you didn't think that little bit at the end with Julia calling Reese felt disjointed or tacked on or dumb?

Nikki: No, I think you're right.

Nikki: I don't think it stood out to me well, so initially I had something in here I'm just going to tell him myself that said, I like that when he calls her sassy.

Salina: I love that.

Salina: I really do like that.

Salina: That's sweet.

Nikki: I think it's because I hear them in real life.

Nikki: I think we've talked before about how on the show we're about their relationship, but off screen, I truly believe that those two were made for each other and I think they were very in love and it seems like they had a really good relationship.

Nikki: So I think a lot of times it's confusing for me.

Nikki: But yeah.

Nikki: Did she need the comfort?

Nikki: I guess that is a little unclear.

Salina: What I will say is that cut line where they talk about what she would do if she found out Reese had a mistress maybe if I had seen that on screen, that would have made me feel differently because it really is kind of I should say that carefully because I don't have the whole script memorized, but I don't have a clear memory of us talking about Reese.

Salina: Otherwise he wasn't part of this episode.

Salina: It wasn't relevant.

Nikki: He hasn't really been mentioned a lot.

Salina: At all, been busy.

Salina: It's really challenging in that case to remember how close their relationship is and to remember why I should care that she worries about him having a mistress, if that makes sense.

Salina: And we did have that episode where she was a little worried he had one.

Nikki: Exactly.

Nikki: And I think that's a good point.

Nikki: If you think about that and the insecurities that she had, then maybe coupled with this, it could be a little bit of a callback, I guess.

Salina: So I think that's fair.

Salina: That was the only thing that I had kind of as a and that's a light criticism because again, I'm acknowledging that if I had seen the whole episode uncut, maybe it would have struck me differently.

Salina: But I also think, not having seen Reese in a while, it's just really hard to hold in my brain that they have this such a close relationship that she needed to reaffirm herself of their relationship after going through this experience.

Salina: It probably would have played better with someone like Bill or someone that we've seen Charlene really close with.

Nikki: I was going to ask you real quickly before because look, I'd like to move on and we'll rate this one, but I wanted to ask you, do you classify this in that category of Designing Women episodes, of absurd episodes?

Salina: No.

Nikki: Okay.

Salina: No, not quite.

Salina: But now that you've asked the question, I'm wondering if I should when I think of absurd, I think of like the Cat.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: For some reason, though, I didn't initially.

Nikki: But then I was starting to think maybe this one could fall into that kind of, like, surreal whatever, which I typically am on record as those are not my favorite episodes.

Nikki: But I really like this one, which made me feel like maybe I was.

Nikki: If we did classify that way.

Nikki: Maybe they're bringing me around.

Salina: Yeah, I think you're probably right.

Salina: I think it falls it might actually fall in the same realm as like, the cat episode.

Salina: And you call them like the circular episodes that don't what did you just call that?

Salina: Bottleneck that don't really move the plot along.

Salina: They don't really tell us much else about the characters, but they're just darn entertaining.

Salina: And what I will say about this one, getting this gets into my rating, but it's a nice palate cleanser through that last kind of emotionally heavy reflective episode we talked about.

Nikki: I'm saying, yeah.

Nikki: As you know, I cried a lot.

Salina: I know this should have been a real release for you.

Nikki: Between that and still Magnolias, I'm very dry.

Salina: I was going to tell you.

Salina: You look a little puffy.

Nikki: Oh, well, thank you.

Nikki: Whatever a woman likes to hear, it's not true.

Nikki: So what was your rating scale for this one?

Salina: Jelly covered rice cakes.

Nikki: Okay, fair enough.

Nikki: And how many jelly covered rice cakes?

Nikki: If we don't make me say that three times fast.

Salina: I'm trying to start.

Salina: If I'm changing my rating now, I think I'm going to stick with it a four out of five.

Salina: Like I said, it was a nice, palate cleanser.

Salina: We had a super long, kind of emotionally charged, super reflective episode last episode.

Salina: So this one didn't, like we just said, didn't move much along in terms of the plot, didn't tell us much more about our characters, but it was just a nice, fun, snippy episode, which I like.

Nikki: Yeah, I agree.

Nikki: I also gave it four out of five.

Nikki: Wouldn't that be funny if we had the exact same hilarious I gave it four out of five.

Nikki: Courageous, all white rooms.

Nikki: I'm marking it this high because I had zero dislikes, so I feel like it would be weird for me to be like two.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: Also, when I think about it, in concert with some of my favorite episodes, I don't think it's as good as those, and that's why I'm not marking it as a five.

Nikki: But I do think it's super solid onto a next category of other dated references.

Nikki: Anything come up for you?

Salina: I have a handful.

Salina: I have the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle cereal.

Salina: These were a real thing from 89 to 92.

Salina: They were made by Ralston Purina as a cat food.

Salina: It's kind of like checks with Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle themed marshmallows.

Nikki: Of course, it's always marshmallows.

Salina: And it featured different inbox premiums during its production run.

Salina: So, like toys and stuff, which we don't do anymore, just for the record.

Nikki: Oh, really?

Salina: No, I don't buy a lot of this sort of cereal because I think novelty cereal is way full of sugar, and your kids, they just don't need that all the time.

Salina: But occasionally we have bought it and there are not toys really in there ever.

Salina: I think, actually, I'm going to go off script here, but I think there's probably something to that.

Salina: Like, it's illegal now because it was an incentive to get these kids to buy really sugary cereal.

Salina: Like that thing we talked about one time about how certain commercials were outlawed during Saturday morning cartoons until they weren't.

Salina: I think it's the same thing.

Nikki: Right?

Salina: I also had dieting on rice cakes.

Salina: That was a very upset thing, that baby carrier car seat thing.

Salina: Charlene brought Olivia in.

Nikki: Mine says that ancient looking car seat.

Salina: Yeah, it just doesn't look very safe.

Salina: It probably wasn't.

Salina: I guess we're just lucky she's in one, right?

Salina: Charlene's not carrying.

Nikki: It was like the middle era before they just strapped kids to the top.

Nikki: Then they started trying kind of charlene.

Salina: Referenced seeing a movie in which Victoria Principal played a mistress.

Salina: So generally speaking, Victoria Principal is well known for playing Pam Ewing on Dallas.

Salina: But according to her Wikipedia, she won her first film role as Marie Elena, a Mexican mistress in John Houston's the Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean in 1972, opposite Paul Newman, for which she earned a Golden Globe nomination as most promising newcomer.

Nikki: Oh, okay.

Nikki: I also looked up a little bit about her.

Nikki: But she has played a mistress.

Salina: She was in Lifetime movies, right?

Nikki: It's funny that you say that.

Nikki: I'm just going to go ahead and say it.

Nikki: Let's just rip off the Band Aid.

Nikki: So I was like, what?

Nikki: Mistress movies?

Nikki: I'm just curious.

Nikki: Was it really like 100?

Nikki: Because she gets to mention you did say Victoria Principal, right?

Nikki: Yeah, because also Lindsay Wagner, they mentioned her, too, and they're just like they're always mistresses or something like that.

Nikki: I don't know.

Nikki: So I just started to look back in their TV history to see their filmography, to see what are we talking about here?

Nikki: So for Victoria principal, I filmed Mistress.

Salina: Since the 1987 TV.

Nikki: They didn't try real hard on that one.

Nikki: And then Lindsay Wagner, I filmed Passions.

Nikki: And it's funny that you say that about being Lifetime because I forgot about this whole genre of TV movies that used to be like a thing.

Nikki: And it was like all these Danielle Still novels that were made into movies.

Nikki: They played on a loop on Lifetime.

Salina: I watched them all.

Salina: Me too.

Nikki: And they always had, like they were always, like these family dramas, but they starred, like, big TV stars from, like a decade prior.

Salina: And that's how I learned about them.

Nikki: Right?

Nikki: Or like that's how I think about the dad from, like, step by step.

Salina: Like Patrick Duffy.

Nikki: Yeah.

Nikki: Who was also in it was Dallas.

Nikki: Yeah, Dallas.

Salina: Thank you.

Nikki: So he's on all of these you're right.

Nikki: And it'd be like Stepdad or dad while Mom's gone.

Nikki: Mom while Dad's gone.

Nikki: Like all this kind of stuff.

Nikki: Yeah.

Nikki: And like, my grandma, for some reason, would have them on VHS and you just like, there just wasn't enough stuff.

Nikki: So I pop one in and watch them because what are you going to do?

Salina: Nothing.

Nikki: I'm an only child.

Nikki: I have nothing going on.

Nikki: I wasn't playing.

Salina: Summer was different back then, wasn't it?

Nikki: It must have been.

Nikki: So anyways, that really got me thinking about that whole time period that is like, of a time before.

Nikki: And that's nice because dated references, am I right?

Salina: You're right.

Nikki: Southern things.

Salina: Okay, so we got another Sam Walton reference and then my last Southern reference.

Nikki: Okay.

Nikki: Good because I have zero.

Salina: I'm bringing it in because you brought this up previously.

Salina: Green Acres.

Salina: I really wasn't going to say much more about this one.

Nikki: Right, but talked about it.

Salina: Because we've talked about it, but we referenced it and I wanted to remind people that it ran from September 15, 1965 to April 27, 1971.

Salina: It was canceled in 1971 as part of the Rural Purge by CBS, which we've talked about here before.

Nikki: That's right.

Nikki: So.

Salina: See, I do.

Salina: Listen.

Salina: I just forget something, right?

Nikki: Don't we all?

Salina: Yeah, but mine are much more public aged.

Salina: Mine are much more public.

Nikki: I don't think that's true.

Nikki: So I didn't have any Southern things.

Nikki: Do we want to go on to references that we need to talk about?

Salina: I have two.

Salina: Laliki is actually Lache, which is actually Lache League International, which is a nonprofit founded in 1956 that aims to improve breastfeeding.

Salina: I did like a super cursory Google to see if there was a reason they were talking about it in this episode.

Salina: I mean, obviously, other than Charlene being recently postpartum, I didn't find anything especially relevant happening in or around the organization during this time.

Nikki: No, but they sound like a cool organization.

Nikki: They are cool, except they're not, is what you're about to tell me.

Salina: No, I'm going to say that the breastfeeding culture can be very toxic for a postpartum mother.

Salina: In the same way.

Nikki: In the other way, yes.

Salina: And so that's my where's my middle ground, man?

Salina: The middle ground is everyone.

Salina: Similar to what I said about drugs.

Salina: Drugs during delivery in episode 13.

Nikki: And just drugs.

Nikki: Go on.

Salina: Just let parents, especially moms, do their thing and be a mom and make good choices.

Nikki: So you're saying sometimes it's a little hard the other way.

Salina: So Lalete pushes really hard to improve breastfeeding, which I think is beautiful.

Salina: I delivered both times.

Salina: It's designated as a breastfeeding friendly hospital, which means they go like, above and beyond in terms of improving breastfeeding.

Salina: I had a lot of issues with it, and I can tell you that with my first, I was in the hospital in tears with a lactation consultant shoving my child against me while my nipples were bleeding and I was crying.

Nikki: I am telling you, I have heard more horror stories like that than I've heard.

Nikki: Like and then they latched and the rainbows broke through the clouds.

Nikki: And not to say I'm not trying to take away from the beauty.

Nikki: I'm just trying to say, like, I have talked to multiple mothers who went through the highest levels of anxiety and then got to subsequently feel like crap about themselves.

Nikki: And that is really not fair.

Salina: I can't remember if I've talked about this before, so I'm sorry if I'm repeating myself, but I think it's important for people to hear that.

Salina: Like I said in episode 13 with my daughter, I had a really traumatic birthing experience.

Salina: And then the breastfeeding experience was terrible and I was a first time parent.

Salina: All of that needs to be factored in.

Salina: But I spent the first three weeks of her life taking her back and forth to the pediatrician, getting her weighed almost every day, where she was consistently losing weight because breastfeeding wasn't working.

Salina: I was to the point where I was filtering borrowed breast milk.

Salina: I had someone donate breast milk to me, I was filtering it through a tube to a little shield on my breast, having her drink that trying to get the latch to work.

Salina: To the point where finally we went to her pediatrician who was an older man.

Salina: I had not had the best experiences with him because he's been pediatrician since the he would talk to my husband, he wouldn't talk to me.

Salina: And one day he finally looked at me and he said, mom, you're not doing anything wrong.

Salina: He said, But I have to tell you, the definition of crazy is trying the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.

Salina: Something's not working.

Salina: It's not your fault, but you need to make a good decision for your baby right now.

Salina: And we switched to formula and I never regretted it.

Salina: I didn't even try breastfeeding with my son at the hospital.

Salina: I told him flat out, leave me alone.

Salina: And so I think that Charlene's storyline, so much of these early days are resonating with me because they're making me feel really sensitive about things that are just sort of accepted for new moms and really aren't super fair.

Nikki: Yeah, well, I think that makes sense.

Salina: No, I'm triagered no, I get that.

Nikki: I don't get it, but I get.

Salina: It if that makes sense.

Nikki: I think what I just thought was cool about this is the fact that this organization had a big hand in some other things around the birthing process.

Nikki: Like being an early advocates for natural birth.

Nikki: Again, just getting all the options on.

Salina: Just letting people have options I think is fantastic.

Nikki: Not like making it be hard way one way or the other.

Nikki: Now that you've said this other thing, it makes me a little that maybe no one should be making anyone feel guilty.

Salina: To be clear, I'm not putting that on Lalete, but I'm sure they were part of that culture shift.

Salina: Yeah, I know they were because there were Lalete resources sent to me while I was trying to breastfeed.

Nikki: Sure.

Nikki: And then the other thing that I thought was really cool was like this idea they did want to get dads in the delivery room and I'm just saying if you're part of the process, get you a little b*** on in there.

Nikki: And that bonding that you were talking about, they were big advocates for that too and I thought that was really cool.

Salina: It is cool.

Salina: I really liked that.

Salina: And when I delivered because it was a breastfeeding friendly hospital, a lot of that was just built into the process and it was really beautiful.

Salina: It's wonderful.

Salina: I think exactly what you're saying is the shortest version of what I'm trying to say, which is just give Moms the option.

Salina: And then depending on what option they take, don't make them feel bad about it.

Salina: Just empower them and tell them they're doing a good job because chances are good.

Salina: They really are.

Salina: We're all just trying to keep this kid alive.

Nikki: Yeah, for sure.

Salina: My other reference I wanted to talk about briefly is also related to Steel Magnolias.

Salina: It's slightly out of order.

Salina: Charlene said, I'm sure most men would give their eye teeth to look through that window.

Salina: And in Steel Magnolias, Clary says most people in Chicapin Paris would parish would give their eye teeth to take a whack.

Salina: A weezer context tells you it means they like it very much.

Salina: In reality, it's the canine tooth in the upper jaw.

Salina: Clinically, they're called the cuspids, but they call it the eye teeth because they're like, right near your eyes.

Salina: I'm going to have to sit with.

Nikki: That one for a little bit, I think.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: Wow.

Nikki: Okay.

Nikki: Wow.

Nikki: Taking those.

Salina: I thought about putting it in Southern references, but I couldn't verify that it was Southern.

Salina: So I put it in references to talk about.

Nikki: That's crazy.

Nikki: Okay, let's see.

Nikki: I had just this idea of country French and the neoclassic references.

Salina: Yeah.

Nikki: There was also are you one or the other?

Salina: I can almost assure you I'm not neoclassic.

Salina: If that's like modern and minimal, that's just not my style.

Nikki: It's very timeless style inspired by antiquity.

Nikki: Think Greek and Roman columns, that kind of thing.

Nikki: Sounds so gabby, am I right?

Nikki: So classic.

Nikki: I do venture towards the country French, although.

Salina: That sounds kitschy to me.

Nikki: It does, but it's really not when you look at it.

Nikki: So it's like the rustic armoire that Chip and Joanna that their farmhouse trend sits in.

Nikki: But it's like literally inspired by the French countryside.

Nikki: It's like where rustic meets refined.

Nikki: So I think kind of like I mean literally like little French country houses.

Nikki: So kind of like exposed brick and just like you see the imperfections in the house, but they make it warm and comfortable.

Nikki: So if I had to pick between the two, I would definitely pick country French.

Nikki: To be clear, I am nothing.

Salina: My aunt asked me one time after we bought our first house, what's your style?

Salina: And I was like, Things I like, I don't know that it all sounds very pretentious to me.

Nikki: I just think, like, don't lock yourself into one.

Salina: That may be true, too.

Nikki: Alyssa Patreon of the show, and I often will talk about that in decorating style.

Nikki: When you lock yourself into one look, it's just like some stuff dies so hard you don't really want to do that.

Salina: And then you get stuck with checkerboard tile or something.

Nikki: Something.

Nikki: And it's just better to mix and match and bring in different fills and textures and exactly what you're saying, like, just love it.

Nikki: It's a decorating show.

Nikki: So I figured I should bring up these decorating styles that got brought up.

Nikki: But I did think it was also kind of fun that they put them in these two different like, this is my wife, this is my girlfriend, and they have two different styles.

Nikki: And then George Bush, his Thousand Points of Light theme comes up.

Nikki: I'm not going to go all into the details of that except for just to say this was referring to volunteerism, likening volunteers, organizations and clubs to Points of Light, which honestly, it seems like it was a little satirized at the time.

Nikki: But I actually think where people were, like, poking fun at him a little bit for it.

Nikki: But I think that's actually kind of a beautiful sentiment.

Nikki: And it does have a Southern connection because it goes on to be like an organization after his presidency.

Nikki: And then today it exists as Points of Light, and it merged with the Atlanta based Hands on Network in 2007.

Nikki: And so it's headquartered here in Atlanta but also Washington and New York.

Nikki: And they do volunteer work.

Nikki: And I think that's the last one I have.

Salina: All right, next episode, season four, episode 15 or 16.

Salina: It's called the fur flies.

Nikki: I do think it's 15.

Nikki: I think it's just this is our 15th episode, okay.

Nikki: Because we pulled out Still Magnolias and did its own.

Nikki: Okay.

Salina: So next episode will be episode 15, the Fur Flies of designing of Designing Women.

Salina: We've just confused everybody.

Nikki: Yeah, we sure have.

Salina: We'd love everyone to follow along with us and engage Instagram and Facebook at Sweet tea and TV TikTok at sweettvpod.

Salina: Our email address is sweettvpod@gmail.com, and our website is www.sweettv.com.

Salina: There are also several ways to support the show.

Salina: You can tell your family and friends about us, rate or review the podcast wherever you listen.

Salina: And then you can visit our website to find additional ways to support the show.

Salina: And as Salina reminded us in the last main episode, we also are posting on YouTube now.

Salina: So that's another way to catch the show.

Nikki: It's happening.

Salina: He's happening.

Salina: So come back Thursday for extra Sugar, where we're going to talk about the.

Nikki: Evolution of fidelity, it's inverse and the dreaded M word.

Salina: Oh, boy.

Nikki: Simple stuff.

Nikki: All right, well, you know what that means.

Salina: What does it mean, Salina?

Nikki: It means we'll see you around the bend.

Nikki: Bye.


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